Sensemaking and Identity Development: Different Fields, Similar Processes, but How?

Ajay K. Ojha (1)
(1) Department of Speech Communication at Southern Illinois University Carbondale, United States

Abstract

The following article examines sensemaking and the minority/majority identity development models as processual theories. While these theories are offered in different concentrations of Speech Communication (i.e., Organizational Communication and Intercultural Communication respectively), they are actually interrelated concepts that share similarities. Sensemaking is a process where individuals attempt to understand unknown elements because of unfamiliar/uncertain situations. Identity development is very similar to sensemaking because we have to make sense of who we are in everyday life through unfamiliarity. Sensemaking and identity development are two similar theories that impact our identity/identities within organizations. In order to articulate this connection further, I explain sensemaking and the minority/majority identity development models. I also synthesize sensemaking and minority/majority identity development noting other relevant theories.

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Authors

Ajay K. Ojha
ajayojha@hotmail.com (Primary Contact)
Author Biography

Ajay K. Ojha, Department of Speech Communication at Southern Illinois University Carbondale

Ajay K. Ojha became Ph.D. 2005 in the Department of Speech Communication at Southern Illinois University Carbondale. He earned his M.A. in Speech Communication from Eastern Illinois University, 2000, and B.A. from The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill in Communication Studies, 1998. Ajay’s research areas include intercultural communication and organizational communication.

Ojha, A. K. (2005). Sensemaking and Identity Development: Different Fields, Similar Processes, but How?. Journal of Intercultural Communication, 5(3), 1–08. https://doi.org/10.36923/jicc.v5i3.412

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