Intercultural Language Trends at a Quadriethnic English-medium University in the Baltics

Benjamin Breggin (1)
(1) Stockholm School of Economics in Riga-Latvia, Latvia

Abstract

This article examines intercultural communication in the context of student social life at the Stockholm School of Economics in Riga. The undergraduate students at this institution represent all four major ethno-linguistic groups of the Baltics, their native languages being Estonian, Latvian, Lithuanian and/or Russian. All of them are also fluent speakers of English, the only study language of the university. Through the analysis of survey and interview data, their trends in language choices and perceptions are established with an eye towards possible future developments in the increasingly English-savvy Baltics. A sociocultural synopsis of the Baltics is provided at the beginning of the article to aid readers not yet acquainted with the region.

Full text article

Generated from XML file

References

Ammon, U. (1991). Die internationale Stellung der deutschen Sprache. Berlin / New York: de Gruyter. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/9783110886498

Butkus, A. and L. Donskis. (2006). The Baltics – A Forgotten Future Project. Lithuanian Foreign Policy Review, no. 18, pp. 182-190.

Fonzari, L. (1999). English in the Estonian Multicultural Society. World Englishes, vol. 18, no. 1, pp. 39-48. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1111/1467-971X.00120

Hogan-Brun, G. (2006). At the Interface of Language Ideology and Practice: The Public Discourse Surrounding the 2004 Education Reform in Latvia. Language Policy, vol. 5, no. 3, pp. 313-333. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s10993-006-9028-1

Hogan-Brun, G. and R. Meilutė. (2004). Changing Levels of Bilingualism across the Baltic. International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism, vol. 7, no. 1, pp. 62-77. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1080/13670050408667801

Ilves, T. (1999, December 14). Estonia as a Nordic Country. Speech given at the Swedish Institute for International Affairs. Transcript available on the Estonian Ministry of Foreign Affairs website: http://www.vm.ee/eng/nato/1210.html

Insider. (2006, June). Gossips, p. 11. Available at: http://insider.sseriga.edu.lv/_data/pdf/3rd%20Insider.pdf

International Herald Tribune. (2007, 3 September). Estonian language reform begins in Russian-speaking schools. Available at: http://www.iht.com/articles/ap/2007/09/04/europe/EU-GEN-Estonia-School-Reform.php

Muižnieks, N. (2006). Government Policy and the Russian Minority. Muižnieks, N. (ed.), Latvian-Russian Relations: Domestic and International Dimensions, pp. 11-21. Riga: Latvijas Universitāte.

Official Language Law. (2000). Translation of Valsts valodas likums, 1999, by Translation and Terminology Centre, Riga. Available on the Centre for Curriculum Development and Examinations website: http://isec.gov.lv/normdok/oflanglaw.htm

Pavlenko, A. (2008). Russian in post-Soviet countries. Russian Linguistics, vol. 32, no. 1, pp. 59-80. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s11185-007-9020-1

Priedīte, A. (2002). Latvian language acquisition – a fight with myths, stereotypes and prejudices. Sociolingüística internacional. Available at: http://www6.gencat.net/llengcat/noves/hm02hivern/internacional/letonia.pdf

Simonian, R. (2004). The Russian Diaspora in the Baltic Countries. Russian Politics and Law, vol. 42, no. 4, pp. 67-88. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1080/10611940.2004.11066925

Šupule, I. and B. Zepa. (2006). Ethnopolitical Tensions in Latvia: Factors Facilitating and Impeding Ethnic Accord. Muižnieks, N. (ed.), Latvian-Russian Relations: Domestic and International Dimensions, pp. 33-40. Riga: Latvijas Universitāte.

Authors

Benjamin Breggin
bbreggin@sseriga.edu.lv (Primary Contact)
Author Biography

Benjamin Breggin, Stockholm School of Economics in Riga-Latvia

Benjamin Breggin is coordinator of the English language programme at the Stockholm School of Economics in Riga. He has a BA from Sarah Lawrence College and a PhD from the University of Edinburgh.

Breggin, B. (2009). Intercultural Language Trends at a Quadriethnic English-medium University in the Baltics. Journal of Intercultural Communication, 9(3), 1–08. https://doi.org/10.36923/jicc.v9i3.485

Article Details

Smart Citations via scite_
Views
  • Abstract 93
  • Download PDF 31